Course Descriptions


ACC 210: Principles of Accounting (6 credits)
Prerequisite: BSA 101

This is an introductory course in accounting. It covers such topics as accounting and business environment, translating business activities into accounting information, accounting cycle, merchandising operations, inventory, internal control and cash, receivables, liabilities, assets and intangibles, time value of money and financial statements, using information from accounting system for investment and management decisions.

 

ACC 310: Financial Accounting (6 credits)
Prerequisite: ACC 210

The course introduces financial accounting concepts and principles. It is designed to be a combination of both accounting and finance that will lay a strong background for further studies in financial subjects. The course covers the following topics: accounting principles and concepts; balance sheets, accrual vs. cash basis of income measurement; income statement; journals and ledger recording; trial balance, accrual and deferral adjustments, the  accounting cycle, sales, cash and accounts receivable; estimating uncorrectable accounts, valuing inventories, ratio and trend analysis, present and future value concepts; liabilities, statements of cash flows, stockholders’ equity, dividends and treasury stock.

 

ACC 350: Accounting Information Systems (6 credits)
Prerequisite: ACC 210, BSA 210

This course introduces the foundations of accounting information systems, provides knowledge and skills required by accountants as users, managers, designers, and evaluators of information systems. The topics covered include choosing, extracting, and analyzing relevant information to solve business problems, documenting and modeling business processes, developing information systems, and designing and evaluating internal controls in information systems, analyzing and resolving contemporary issues in accounting information systems.

 

ACC 410: Managerial Accounting (6 credits)
Prerequisite: FIN 310, ACC 210

The course covers approaches to providing accounting and processing information for effective management of for-profit and nonprofit organizations.

 

ACC 415: Statutory Accounting (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ACC 210

The course covers the study of statutory accounts and reporting requirements; domestic auditing standards; and domestic oil and gas accounting requirements.

 

ACC 420: Financial Reporting (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ACC 210, FIN 310

The course covers analysis of the International Financial Reporting Standards, focusing on revenue and expense recognition and the measurement of assets and liabilities; concepts and theories underlying financial statements; introduction to international reporting standards; balance sheet; income statement, statement of changes in equity; cash flow statement; cash and receivables; inventory; revenue and expense recognition; property, plant and equipment; intangible assets.

  

ACC 430: International Accounting (6 credits)
Prerequisite: ACC 210

Securities regulation and trading; various national accounting standards; the harmonization of accounting standards internationally; accounting for the translation of transactions and foreign subsidiary financial statements.

 

ACC 440: Cost Accounting (6 credits)                       

Prerequisite: ACC 210, FIN 310

Students study cost accounting, accounts and investments; inventory accounts; manufacturing accounts; and material use variance accounts.

 

ACC 450: Auditing (6 credits)
Prerequisite: ACC 310

The course develops student’s knowledge of auditing services. Topics include the role of auditing services in society, audit programs planning, design and implementation.

 

ACC 490: Taxation (6 credits)                            

Prerequisite: ACC 310

This course introduces students to the tax concepts applicable to sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, estates, and trusts. Emphasis is placed on differences between tax and financial accounting concepts. In addition, students are exposed to accounting periods and methods, deferred compensation, tax planning, ethical practices, and tax research.

 

ACC 800: Accounting for Financial Decisions (6 credits)

Prerequisite: None

This course is designed for graduate students. The course will focus on the financial decision makers. The purpose of this course is to introduce the «basic concepts» of accounting and finance. With knowledge in accounting and the basic elements of finance, one can understand how specific techniques and decision rules can be used. The course covers the following topics: basic accounting concepts, revenue and monetary systems, cost of sales and inventory, non-monetary assets, sources of capital, and strategic investment decisions.

 

ACC 801: Financial Accounting (6 credits)  

Prerequisites: None

The course is designed for the graduate students majoring in Economics and Business Administration as a required course. This course will focus on the user of accounting information. The purpose of this course is to introduce the «basic concepts» of accounting. With knowledge in accounting, one can understand how specific techniques and decision rules can be used from accounting records. The course covers the following topics: analyzing transactions; the matching concept and adjusting process; completing the accounting cycle; accounting for different types of businesses; accounting systems, internal controls and cash; receivables; inventories; fixed assets and intangible assets; current liabilities; corporations: organization, capital stock transactions and dividends; corporations: income and taxes, stockholders’ equity and investments in stocks; bonds payable and investments into bonds; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis.

 

ACC 810: Auditing (6 credits)                              

Prerequisite: ACC 800 or ACC 801

The course provides knowledge important for the students majoring in Accounting and Finance. It includes planning audit, designing audit programs with internal control, audit evidence, audit work papers, cash and marketable securities, accounts receivable, inventories, property, plant and equipment, accounts payable and other liabilities, debt and equity capital losses and auditor’s reports. Casework is practiced.

 

ACC 840: Management and Cost Accounting (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ACC 800 or ACC 801

Use of accounting information for internal planning and control purposes; role of accounting in decisions concerning resource allocation, cost and performance analysis, evaluation of business units using data obtained from the accounting system. Use of cost information for operational and strategic control; application of statistical tools and decision models to accounting data for the purpose of facilitating managerial control; identifying cost behavior with respect to managerial decision; measuring and controlling the consumption of resources by a firms products; analyzing product cost systems in diverse production and non-manufacturing settings.

 

ACC 860: Accounting Information Systems (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ACC 800 or ACC 801

This course introduces the foundations of accounting information systems, provides knowledge and skills required by accountants as users, managers, designers, and evaluators of information systems. The topics covered include choosing, extracting, and analyzing relevant information to solve business problems, documenting and modeling business processes, developing information systems, and designing and evaluating internal controls in information systems, analyzing and resolving contemporary issues in accounting information systems. This course focuses on the knowledge and skills required providing assurance for information systems for the purpose of managing business risk.

 

ACC 870: International Accounting Practices (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ACC 800 or ACC 801

This course is designed to study and resolve accounting problems involved in international operations. It encompasses the comparative study of different national accounting systems, the problems caused by the existing differences in practices for international operations, and organizations which have emerged to reconcile differences and to handle international accounting problems.

 

ACC 880: Advanced Accounting Topics (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ACC 800 or ACC 801, ACC 840

This course is specialized in accounting topics including accounting and reporting for business combinations, international accounting and foreign currency issues, partnership accounting and other topics.

 

BSA 101: Introduction to Business (6 credits)

Prerequisite: None

A basic background for the various fields of business; a general survey of the entire field of economics, business and management in the free enterprise system; concepts of business and management functions, organizational considerations, and decision-making processes. Explores areas of specialization in the business world; exposure to business in small-medium-large organizations.

 

BSA 205: Computer Applications for Economics and Business (6 credits)

Prerequisite: CMS 101

This is a practical course on how to use a computer, especially the personal computer, as an economic and business problem-solving tool. The course is based on tools provided by Microsoft Office and plenty of examples of economic and business problems.

 

BSA 210: Computer Applications in Business (6 credits)

Prerequisite: CMS 101

This is a practical course on how to use a computer, especially the personal computer, as a business problem-solving tool. The course is based on tools provided by Microsoft Office and examples from accounting, finance and management courses.

 

BSA 215: Statistical Methods for Economics and Business (6 credits)

Prerequisite: MATH 101

The course builds a foundation in statistics and develops applications of statistical tools to economic analysis. It includes: descriptive statistics, probabilities, estimation, and regression analysis. Cases and statistical packages support the course content.

 

BSA 250: Business Statistics (8 credits)                                             

Prerequisite: MATH 101

The course builds a foundation on statistics and develops applications to business decision making. It includes: descriptive statistics, probabilities, estimation, and regression analysis. The course also provides a set of skills for achieving and maintaining statistical process control methods and problem-solving tools. Cases and micro-computer statistical packages support the course content.

 

BSA 410: Business Analysis (6 credits)

Prerequisite: BSA 250, MATH 225

The course combines statistical analysis, modeling and decision making approaches. Topics covered are: data collection, processing, analysis and interpretation; modeling, simulation and decision analysis.

 

BSA 435: Taxation Policy (6 credits)                    

Prerequisite: LAW 305

The study of fundamental income tax problems in business, investments and personal decisions; tax problems arising for business, corporations; shareholder's tax problems; current trends in law and taxation policy; comparative analyses of different countries.

 

BSA 440:  Business Research (6 credits)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

The course covers the main research tools applicable in applied business research. Basics of research problem formulation, research proposal, research design, different types of study, data collection and information sources, measurement, quantitative and qualitative data processing, hypothesis testing, data analysis, presentation and reporting, and ethics in business research are the main subjects of the course.

 

BSA 690: Information Technology for Decisions (6 credits)

Prerequisite: BSA 210

The course has the main goal of providing students with applied knowledge in the use of information technology and systems in modern society, to learn how to make use of the most efficient programs in text processing, data management, spreadsheets and communications. Information nets, methods of information services in foreign trade, production management, the banking system (SWIFT), international tourism, and other topics will be examined.

 

BSA 880: Business Research Methods (6 credits)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

The course covers the main research tools applicable in applied and theoretical business research. Research problem formulation, research proposal, research design, different types of study, data collection and information sources, measurement, quantitative and qualitative data processing, hypothesis testing, data analysis, presentation and reporting, and ethics in business research are the main subjects of the course.

 

ECON 101: Introduction to Economics (6 credits)

Prerequisite: None

This is an introductory course on the market economy, economic way of thinking. Students should gain knowledge about such market instruments as: demand and supply-aggregation, equilibrium, scarcity, surplus and choices; aggregate demand and supply, government expenditures and income, consumption’s and savings, investments, ways to achieve macroeconomics equilibrium; monetary and fiscal policy in solving problems with inflation, unemployment, investments.

 

ECON 201: Principles of Microeconomics (8 credits)                        

Prerequisite: MATH 101, BSA 101

The course deals with the laws of demand, supply, returns and costs; these basic tools are used to show how prices and outputs are determined in different market situations; perfect (pure) competition, monopoly, monopolistic competition and oligopoly.

 

ECON 202: Principles of Macroeconomics (6 credits)

Prerequisite: MATH 101, BSA 101

The course provides an understanding of the analytic methods of macroeconomics. Students should examine models explaining fluctuations in national income, unemployment, price levels, GNP, monetary issues, limitations and applications of these models.

 

ECON 211: Economics of Tourism (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 201

The course application of the economic principles to the tourism and hospitality industry, supply and demand and determination of prices, the impact of the general state of the economy, GDP, growth and fluctuations of the development on the tourism industry.

 

ECON 270: Economy of Azerbaijan (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 101 or BSA 101

This course provides a historical review of the Azerbaijan economy, examines structure (industrial, organizational) of economy, features of development of each sector in different periods, modern problems of the Azerbaijan economy, transition to the market, privatization, and directions of economic reforms.

 

ECON 310: Intermediate Microeconomics (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 101

This course develops models of the behavior of individual economic units, including consumers, workers, investors, and business firms, and explains how and why these units make economic decisions. Economic behavior in various types of market environments is analyzed. The implications of this behavior for the allocation of resources and for public policy are discussed.

 

ECON 315: Intermediate Macroeconomics (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 101

This course applies the tools of aggregate economic analysis to the problems of the performance of the economy. The course links the theories and data to understand the causes of macroeconomic fluctuations in production, employment, inflation and international economic relations; particular emphasis is placed on macroeconomic policy issues.

  

ECON 360: International Economic Relations of Azerbaijan (6 credits)

 Prerequisite: ECON 101or BSA 101

The course covers historical analyses of International Economic Relations of Azerbaijan; trade traditions, participation in financial, industrial and other international organizations; comparative analyses of international relations for different branches of industry and with different countries.

 

ECON 380: History of Economic Thought (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 201, ECON 202

The course covers a historical presentation of the economic doctrines of the physiocratic, classical, neoclassical, historical, Keynesian, and other schools of thought.

 

ECON 390: World Economy (6 credits)              

Prerequisite: ECON 202 or ECON 315

The course gives to students the main directions in the structure of world economy; world population, industry, agriculture, global problems of the world development such as environment protection, utilizing of the oceans and the space, international cooperation; World economy as a system consisting of various national subsystems, the modeling methods of the world economy development.

 

ECON 420: Regional Economics (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 202 or ECON 315

The course provides a study of the development of the Azerbaijan economy and economies of the neighboring countries with an emphasis on the regional cooperation, recent development tendencies, structural changes, performance and institutional patterns.

 

ECON 425: Environmental Economics and Policy (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 202 or ECON 315

This course is designed to introduce the student to a broad range of contemporary environmental problems and the design of appropriate policy responses. The role of economic development and the political and social forces deter-mining environmental quality is explored. The effectiveness of different environmental policies and regulations are analyzed.

 

ECON 430: Economics of Entrepreneurship and Innovation (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 201, ECON 202 or ECON 310, ECON 315

The purpose of this course is to introduce the analysis of innovation and entrepreneurship. The course will emphasize the shift in economic activity away from the traditional inputs of natural resources, unskilled labor, and capital, to a knowledge-based high-tech economy. Innovation is examined at the macroeconomic, microeconomic and spatial level. The course also examines the relationships between government policies, innovation and entrepreneurship.

 

ECON 435: Experimental and Applied Economics (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 201 or ECON 310

This experimental study of economics builds upon the scientific method and the testing of economic theories via computer simulation experiments. Students will gain an understanding of the extent to which basic economic theories predict actual human behavior.

 

ECON 440: Public Finance (6 credits)             

Prerequisite: ECON 202 or ECON 315

The course examines the role of state and local governments in economy, the links between economic analysis and current political issues. Two sides of government budget will be considered: taxation and public expenditures. Optimal Tax Theory will be used as a basic to understand income distribution and evaluation of taxation efficiency. Students will also consider principle programs for public expenditures: public education, health, welfare programs, and social security.

 

ECON 445: Managerial Economics (6 credits)    

Prerequisite: ECON 201 or ECON 310

This is an introductory course in application of microeconomic principles to business decision-making; Quantitative methods are applied to managerial decisions about pricing, production volume; profit maximization, capital budgeting, risk taking.

 

ECON 450: Econometrics (6 credits)                  

Prerequisite: BSA 215 or BSA 250

Course covers the nature of econometrics, economic models (a simple model, a model for a game of chance), sample statistics; the least squares principle, the correlation coefficient, confidence integrals normal distribution, hypothesis testing; models of experiment, one-way analysis, two-way analysis; the foundation of correlation and regression theory; the linear model, solution of the normal equations, nonlinear relationships; the problem of the time series analysis, elementary methods for the time series description.

 

ECON 452: Mathematical Economics (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 201, ECON 202 or ECON 310, ECON 315

This course provides an introduction to mathematical techniques that are used in economic analysis. Topics covered include differential and integral calculus and matrix algebra. Emphasis is placed on the applications of mathematics to topics in economic theory.

 

ECON 454: International Economic Organizations (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 202 or ECON 315

Among international organizations there are some with special activity and importance for the human community, e.g. economic organizations. Some of them, such as International Monetary Fund, United Nations, GATT, World Bank, etc. are studied from the point of view of their structure, main goals and rules. Analyzing activity of those organizations as a means of promoting international relations is the main approach of the course.

 

ECON 455: Economic Analysis (6 credits)   

Prerequisite: ECON, ECON 202 or ECON 310, ECON 315

The course provides background knowledge in macro- and microeconomic analysis. Main topics are demand and supply estimation and analysis, production cost and profit analysis, market structures and decisions, project evaluation and analysis, economic growth, development and forecasting, collection analysis and presentation of economic data.

 

ECON 470: Development Economics (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 202 or ECON 315

The course is about economic growth of countries, structural changes, institutional development, economic policy and growth.

 

ECON 480: International Economics/Trade and Finance (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 202 or ECON 315

The course covers structure of the world economy; world economy as a system of various national economies; globalization and world economic development; international financial systems; global capital markets; international trade; growth and trade; global institutions and world trade.

 

ECON 485: Introduction to Insurance (6 credits)

Prerequisite: FIN 310

The course’s main approach to insurance as a risk-reducing institution defines its contents. The necessity of insurance in different fields of economic and social life is analyzed. Different types of insurance contracts, their features, auto insurance, health insurance, fire insurance, unemployment insurance, and retirement are studied. Risk management is emphasized.

 

ECON 520: Economic Models (6 credits)       

Prerequisite: ECON 202

The course includes such modern economic theories and models as theory of growth, neoclassic model and production function, Caldor’s theory of distribution, theory of demand and supply, dynamic model of market numbers’ behavior, Neumann - Gale model, and transition to new technology, model of mixed economy and equilibrium, analysis of comparative statistics, price regulation and time value, models.

 

ECON 600: Petroleum Economics (6 credits)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

This course is a practical petroleum economics course which introduces students to the methods and practices the international oil industry uses to examine the economic viability of upstream oil and gas projects. The course covers cash flow analysis, economic indicators, depreciation and depletion models, economic analysis tools, sensitivity analysis and expected-value decisions, risk and economic decision analysis.

 

ECON 610: Engineering Economics (6 credits)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor 

This course is a practical engineering economics course, which introduces students the basic principles of economic analysis for application in the decision-making process. The course covers cash flow analysis, economic indicators, depreciation and depletion models, economic analysis tools, sensitivity analysis and expected-value decisions, risk and business decision analysis.

 

ECON 805: Advanced Mathematics for Economists (6 credits)                  

Prerequisite: MATH 225

This course covers the elements of mathematical analysis, optimization techniques, and linear and nonlinear programming, with applications to economics.

 

ECON 810: History of Economic Thought (6 credits)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

This course deals with the development of the political economy from its origin through the twentieth century. The continuity of intellectual and economic thought and their relationship to changing social and political settings are stressed. A particular emphasis is placed on the Classical and neo-Classical theories and their critics.


ECON 815: World Economy (6 credits)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

The course provides an understanding of the major processes in the world economy.  After finishing of the course students will be able to apply the global way of thinking to the analysis of the economical and political problems of the history and today of mankind.

Students will be acquainted with the global economic development problems, causes of economic crises, development peculiarities of the different groups of countries, regional integration and competitiveness processes, and activities of the international political and economical institutions.

 

ECON 820: Information Technology and Business (6 credits)
Prerequisite: None

This course focuses on organization of computing resources, control and management of computer processing, and the future of computer-based information processing and application in business.

 

ECON 825: Economics of the Public Sector (6 credits)

Prerequisite: None

This course provides an analysis of the role of government in the economy; survey of the problems of monopoly, government regulation, externalities, public goods, and income redistribution; emphasis on measuring the output and costs of government services.

 

ECON 830: Managerial Economics (6 credits)    

Prerequisite: None

This course focuses on an application of microeconomic principles to business decision-making. Economic theory and quantitative methods are applied to managerial decisions about pricing, production, profit maximization, capital budgeting, risk taking, and governmental restraints.

 

ECON 835: Theory of the Firm and Business Strategy (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 830

The course examines an application of microeconomic theory and industrial organization to topics for internal firm organization and strategic business decision-making. Topics include transactions cost analysis and empirical implications, multi-product cost concepts, vertical integration, product differentiation and product quality, durable goods pricing, innovation and patents, spatial competition, delivered pricing, prices discrimination, product building, network economies and information implications.

 

ECON 840: Economic Development (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 830

This course focuses on the economic growth of the countries. Course covers such topics as the theories of international trade and finance, monetary-macroeconomics, industrial organization and the new theory of the firm. It proceeds to the analysis of structural change, institutional development, economic policy and growth. The course covers a variety of advanced topics in econometrics. Standard theory is reviewed and extended. Subjects include maximum likelihood, limited dependent variables, method of moments estimation and simultaneous systems estimation.

 

ECON 844: Regional Economics (6 credits)

Prerequisite: Consent of instructor

The course provides a comprehensive study of the development of the Azerbaijan economy and survey of the economic development of the neighboring countries with a special emphasis on the regional cooperation, recent development tendencies, structural changes, performance and institutional patterns.

 

ECON 845: Human Resources and Labor Markets (6 credits)
Prerequisite: None

The course examines the operation of labor markets, the determination of labor supply, labor demand, and wages, and the impact that market forces and institutions have on the practice of human resources management and employment relations.

 

ECON 850: The Economics of Innovation and Entrepreneurship (6 credits)
Prerequisite: ECON 830

This course is designed to present the economic analysis of innovation and entrepreneurship. The first part of the course focuses on innovation. The second part of the course focuses on the particular aspect of innovative activity – entrepreneurship and the role of new and small firms. Theories about Entrepreneurship are introduced. The emergence of the new industries and the performance of the entrepreneurial firms are examined.

 

ECON 855: Macroeconomic Analysis and Forecasting (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 830

The course covers the theory of aggregate demand and supply, sector demand functions (consumption, investment, and money), disequilibrium models, economic growth, inflation, unemployment and expectations, stabilization, and control, economic development analysis and forecasting.

 

ECON 860: Advanced Econometrics (6 credits)

Prerequisite: MGT 800

This course provides a study of linear econometric methods. Subjects cover the classical linear regression model, generalized least squares and an introduction to a symptomatic distribution theory. Topics such as maximum likelihood testing, specification testing, violations of the classical assumption and dichotomous choice models will be examined. This course covers a variety of advanced topics in econometrics. Standard theory is reviewed and extended. Subjects include maximum likelihood, limited dependent variables, method of moments estimation, and simultaneous systems estimation.

 

 ECON 880: International Trade (6 credits)       

 Prerequisite: MGT 828 

 This course develops an understanding of the economic basis for trade. It also examines trade    policies nations adopt, common markets, international resources flows and the multinational corporation.

 

EMGT 410: Energy Economics (6 credits)
Prerequisite: ECON 202 or ECON 315

This course explores the role of energy in the economy, key aspects of energy supply and demand, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. It discusses various aspects of the impact of oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors on economic development of countries.

 

EMGT 420: Environmental Management (6 credits)

Prerequisite: MGT 310

The course provides an overview of environmental management systems and how environmental management systems can support environmental improvements at facilities that are subject to environmental regulations. The course focuses on pollution prevention techniques, processes, and technologies, as well as, environmental management systems. Topics also include industrial ecology, waste minimization, chemical and material substitution, and alternative technologies.

 

EMGT 425: Environmental Economics (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 202 or ECON 315

The course is designed to introduce the student a broad range of contemporary environmental problems. The role of economic development and social forces deter-mining environmental quality is explored. The effectiveness of different environmental policies and regulations are analyzed.

  

EMGT 805: Oil, Gas and Petrochemical Industries (6 credits)

Prerequisite: None

Course provides a comprehensive review of the oil, gas and petrochemical industries history, basic theory, processes, production equipment, business operations, strategies and development tendencies.

 

EMGT 810: Energy Economics (6 credits)
Prerequisite: None 

This course explores the role of energy in the economy, key aspects of energy supply and demand, energy markets, and public policies affecting energy markets. It analyses key players in the energy economics and their role, rational formulation of energy policies and formation of energy markets. It discusses various aspects of the impact of oil, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear power sectors in energy economics and examines such important issues as energy taxation, price regulation, deregulation, energy efficiency, etc.

 

EMGT 812: Oil and Gas Economy (6 credits)
Prerequisite: None

This course provides basic information on principles of functioning, mechanisms and forms of oil and gas markets, principles of transportation and pipelines economy, pricing issue, company social responsibility, contract issues, cash flow movement, Dutch disease, oil and gas funds.  The topics on oil and gas contracts will be helpful for students in terms of understanding of the law and economic bases of government and company relationship. The oil and gas revenues management and sustainability issues in extractive industries are also discussed.         

 

EMGT 815: Energy Geopolitics and Global Energy Security (6 credits)

Prerequisite: None 

The course mainly concentrates on the global geopolitical issues and strategies concerning energy security. Main economic and political actors involved in the energy games, vulnerabilities of different countries and regions of the world in terms of energy security, and strategies applied to overcome these problems are studied thoroughly. Continuously changing agenda of global energy security is studied from up-to-date sources, and new challenges and opportunities are analyzed on a comparative basis.

This course explores energy geopolitics; global energy security; Caspian oil and gas; transportation of Caspian oil and gas; foreign investment; transnational corporations; oil and gas sector; oil strategy; oil fund; EITI initiative; BTC, SCP, Nabucco.

 

EMGT 820: Environmental Management (6 credits)

Prerequisite: None

This course provides an overview of environmental management systems and how environmental management systems can support environmental improvements at facilities that are subject to environmental regulations. The course focuses on pollution prevention techniques, processes, and technologies, as well as, environmental management systems. Topics also include industrial ecology, waste minimization, chemical and material substitution, and alternative technologies.

 

EMGT 825: Energy Resources Management and Environmental Security (6 credits)

Prerequisite: None

This course examines present and potential future energy trends. Energy usage and its impact on the environment are emphasized, as well as economic, technical, and political issues related with the management of energy resources are covered. The topics also include practical aspects of hazardous material and waste management in industry and other components of society, and resource recovery of hazardous waste streams.

  

EMGT 830: Energy Technology and Environment  (6 credits)

Prerequisite: None

This course identifies basic energy system components, and investigates energy generation, transmission and distribution systems. It explores the fundamentals of energy consumption through analysis of energy use and its cost. The course will strike a balance between global energy flows and the details of energy use individuals. Other topics include the technology and infrastructure involved in energy use, the economics of energy use, and government policy regarding energy. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving and identifying ways to improve energy-efficiency through energy management at all levels. The course also explores advanced energy generation technologies such as solar, wind, geothermal, biomass, and fuel cells. Students learn how to assess the environmental, social, and economic impacts of various energy technology choices.

 

EMGT 835: Caspian Energy Resources and Socioeconomic Development of Caspian Countries (6 credits)
Prerequisite: None

The main focus of this course is the study of Caspian energy resources and their impact in the socioeconomic development of Caspian countries. The course mainly analyzes the role and weight of each energy-rich Caspian country in the world total production, their future perspectives, as well as socioeconomic development strategies put forward by each country. It also mentions development strategies of other energy rich-countries of the world in a comparative framework and draws lessons from their experiences for the Caspian countries.

 

EMGT 840: Renewable Energy (8 credits)

Prerequisite: None

The course introduces renewable energy technologies such as solar, wind, biomass, hydro, tidal, wave, geothermal and hybrid systems. The topics covered include the availability and integration of these energy types and technologies, how they work, their advantages, disadvantages, and limitations. The course also examines economic evaluation of renewable energy resources, the environmental consequences of energy conversion and how renewable energy can reduce air pollution and global climate change and why renewable energy is necessary for the sustainable future.


EMGT 850: Operations Management and Logistics (8 credits)

Prerequisite: None

Fundamental decisions and tradeoffs in control of a firm's operations: operations strategy, process analysis, product design and process selection, capacity planning, TQM, supply chain strategy, logistics strategy, resources planning, material requirements planning and material flow controlling, procurement, inventory control, sales and operations planning, global logistics, cross-functional integration (coordination and control); improving the performance of productive systems; and competing through technology and operations.

 

EMGT 860: Energy Project and Supply Chain Management (6 credits)

Prerequisite: None

This course develops analytical and behavioral skills for effective energy project management. Students will learn how to create a project team and a work breakdown structure, estimate task times and costs, and allocate resources in an efficient way. A variety of energy project management cases will be studied. The course also cover topics on supply chain management activities, such as the production plan, master production schedules, materials requirement planning, and capacity planning. Warehouse planning and management, energy resources distribution and transportation, packaging and third party logistics are some of the issues discussed in this course.

 

FIN 310: Fundamentals of Financial Management (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ACC 210

Introduction to Financial Management, financial statements, clash flow, taxis, financial environment, fundamentals concepts, risk and return, time value of money, securities and their valuations, investment and financial decision, cost of capital, capital budgeting, capital management.

 

FIN 320: Corporate Finance (6 credits)               

Prerequisite: FIN 310

This is an introductory course in the financial management of non-financial corporations and the role of interest rates and capital markets in the economy. Topics include the structure and analysis of financial statements, time value of money calculations (using financial calculators), stock and bond valuation of income-producing physical assets, determination of the cost of capital and the profitability of proposed investments in fixed assets, risk-return tradeoffs that must be considered in using financial leverage, and methods used in obtaining funds from the various capital markets.

 

FIN 350: Money, Banking and Financial Institutions (6 credits)              

Prerequisite: ECON 202 or ECON 315

The course examines the structure of the Central Bank, its behavior, form, functions, instruments, goals; deposit creation, money demand and supply; determination of interest rate; understanding of financial instruments; financial institutions: banking firms, depository and non-depository institutions; money market; the structure of rates of return; the peculiarities of economics of money, banking and financial institutions of Azerbaijan Republic.

 

FIN 405: Commercial Loan Analysis (6 credits)

Prerequisite: FIN 310

Students examine financial statements and business characteristics to learn the information content of financial statements. Applications focus on how they can be used to identify the pattern of funds need for a business and the best financing vehicle to meet that need. The primary tools of analysis are financial statement construction, cash flow statements, financial ratios, common-sized statements, cash budgets, proforma statements, sustainable growth, rates, and cost – volume- profit analysis. The course develops an ability to evaluate the needs of a variety of companies that differ with respect to type, industry, profitability, growth, seasonality, cyclicality, and degree of distress.

 

FIN 410: Financial Management (6 credits)                     

Prerequisite: FIN 310

Valuation models, capital budgeting, cost of capital, capital structure, portfolio theory, capital asset pricing models, innovations in treasury management, and financial planning.

 

FIN 415: Public Finance (6 credits)

Prerequisite: ECON 202 or ECON 315

The course covers the following: tundamental principles of public finance. The logic of the budget process. Budget structures and institutions: federal and state-local. Capital budgeting, public infrastructure investment, and project evaluation. Budget methods and practices. Income taxes, taxes on goods and services, property taxes. Revenue from user fees, user charges, and sales by public monopolies. Revenue forecasts, revenue estimates, and tax expenditure budgets. Intergovernmental fiscal relations. Debt administration, cash management and employee retirement funds.

 

FIN 420: Investment Management (6 credits)

Prerequisite: FIN 310

This course explores the practical aspects of investment valuation and portfolio management in a global framework. The focus is on market microstructure, bond- and equity-portfolio management and overall asset allocation.

 

FIN 425: Commercial and Investment Banking (6 credits)

Prerequisite: FIN 310

Course will examine in some details the principal businesses banks are involved in and see how different banks are pursuing different models.  In particular, bank management, financial statements, the asset-liabilities structure, revenue earning features, and risk management of banks will be examined. In addition, their cost and return features, together with recent developments in the industry will be outlined. We will focus on a number of overarching themes, such as the interplay of regulatory changes, globalization, technological advances and financial innovation and the emergence of new markets.

 

FIN 430: Investments (6 credits)                     

Prerequisite: FIN 310

The course combines practical application and theory. During the class sessions concept checks, numerical examples and boxed applications from the popular business press will be introduced. The course covers all of the important investment topics, provides understanding of the value of diversifying portfolios, principles of portfolio building, ways of efficient diversification. Efficient market hypotheses are also analyzed. Students analyze financial statements, study technical analysis and use these and other methods for security analysis.

 

FIN 435: Risk Management (6 credits)             

Prerequisite: FIN 310

This course aims to introduce students to the rationale, principles, process and main tools of risk management. Topics covered include the concept of risk, risk theory, risk measurement, corporate risks and the rationales of corporate risk management, risk management organization and process, and some key tools of risk management.

 

FIN 440: Financial Markets (6 credits)           

Prerequisite: FIN 310

This course provides an understanding of the mechanisms of various financial markets, and institutions such as banks, stock exchanges and brokers. The course develops a critical awareness of the theoretical and practical problems associated with regulating financial markets, investigates how the market structures potentially cause and mitigate financial risk to market participants and end users.